Category Archives: fitness

FODMAP Diet-Apples are bad

Apples are bad.

Excuse me? Apples are good for you! An apple a day keeps the doctor away.

     Well, not for you….along with a million other things you think are healthy.

People with trouble digesting fructose in the large intestine must several limit all FODMAPS (short chain carbohydrates). FODMAP -had you even heard of this? Plus, it’s not just the food, but the volume of food. A bite of apple, some Falafel, and buttered mashed potatoes all together…not good. I can attest to that!

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You can purchase this at Amazon

That’s the story so far. Causes? Radiation side effects, scar tissue, or IBS. Those are the three they are throwing around. I guess it doesn’t matter which it is because the results is the same. Lower left quadrant pain, bloating, constipation and diarrhea…Oh My! You pick. They are all junk. I have always known certain foods bothered me, so maybe it’s been there forever. After consulting with the experts-my oncologist, the gastroenterologist, the nutritionist, my husband, my sister, my co-worker, my walking partner, my mother and mother-in-law, I have decided to move forward with this diet in hopes that my symptoms will abate.

Back to Tripler hospital…

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Tripler stairwell…original 1920 banisters

Game day for me starts today with a colonoscopy and then the FODMAP elimination diet. One aside on the colonoscopy….it’s somehow possible to gain weight during the colon prep. I can only assume it’s from the salts in the OSMOPREP Phosphate pills. But seriously? Ridiculous. I thought evacuating the colon was good for at least 5 pounds. Someone lied to me.  Have you had a colonoscopy yet? What prep did you use?

The FODMAP Elimination Phase-eat nothing….Just kidding! There is lots to eat, kind of.

Allowed: banana, rice, corn chips!, carrots, fish, beer, wine, cheddar cheese, strawberries, blueberries, zucchini, creamy peanut butter to name a few. Oh, wait…pickles and olives

Not Allowed: bread, pasta, flour tortillas, milk, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, beans, yogurt, onions, garlic, and more!

Two weeks on this and then the Challenge Phase…to be continued.

Tell me about your special diets!!

Still alive and kicking!

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Cancer treatment-Top 6 Life hacks!

….So, you or someone you care about has been diagnosed with Cancer….now what? Remember how you made all those plans on January 1 to get organized? This time, it’s real. Successful treatment means being your own best advocate. It means getting the best information and the best treatment you can possibly get. This is not the time to be a shrinking Violet,afraid to offend-you must speak up. Your survival may depend on it!
Before you do this….
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Radiation Treatment at Tripler Army Medical Center
Or this…
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Getting ready for Chemotherapy Infusion
Do This.
 1.  Buy this book….(I read it both times I was diagnosed with Stage 3 Ovarian Cancer)
Cancer: 50 essential things to do Cancer 50 Essential Things by Greg Anderson. Practical and important advice for the newly diagnosed and those recurring.
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2.  Organize!
Get your major appointments, scans, chemotherapy treatments, radiation treatments, and tests written down in one location. You may need it in a year from now or two, or three, or 10! I like a three year calendar or even a five year calendar, because I plan to be around a long time!  Miles Kimball Three Year Calendar or go big and get a five year calendar!
This is only for big ticket items…not daily symptoms or questions. Dream big! You plan to be around for a long time!
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3.  Start a bullet journal
-Keep in this your list of questions for upcoming doctors appointments (even when they pop into your head at 3 in the morning!) 
-Track side effects from chemo and medication
-Migraines? Track the onset symptoms and medications that work
-Find those motivational quotes that keep you going!
-Track exercise! (Yes, you still have to exercise.)
-Track medications!
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4. The American Red Cross gave me an accordion folder that I keep paper test results and informative literature and paper copies of articles on the forefront of cancer research. I used to print off articles and ask my doctor about them at appointments.
5.  EVERY time you see your doctor, ask for a copy of your lab results. Every single time!
6. Don’t be afraid to ask for a second opinion! Doctors expect it. This is your life!! Take ownership of your treatment. Shed that reticence to be “that” patient. Ask for information from your doctor on why he/she wants to do specific tests and what he/she hopes to learn. Your strength comes from your willingness to speak up!! This may be your only chance. This is not a polite dinner party, but it is your very existence!
7. Bring a friend or family member to your appointments with you. Your friend can take notes and ask clarifying questions. (Bring that low maintenance friend who is happy if you talk all the way to the appointment, or if you want to be silent the whole time.)
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Hanging with the kids at treatment

This month is Breast Cancer Awareness and last month was Ovarian Cancer Awareness!

Please share this valuable information with your friends and family. Someone might be waiting for this article right now!
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Now!! Spread the word!

Grey Sky-Talking about Cancer

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Grey Skies Ahead

I recently spoke with a Mid-Pacific graduate, Matt Hoe*, whose father passed away in 2014 of colon cancer. I admired his courage as he fought through the grief of his father’s passing and turned that pain into an award-winning film. His words about cancer, which I first heard at a chapel assembly, were penetrating: “If I were to give you one piece of advice, it would be to learn that abstaining from saying that the sky is grey does not make the clouds go away. It just means that you don’t get to talk about the sky.” Matt’s words resonated long after I heard them. Each month I go to an Ovarian Cancer Support group meeting where women from all over Oahu come to share their stories of surviving and fighting cancer. Many of the women are many years removed from their initial cancer fight and some are still in the thick of it. Some are bald, some wear wigs, some have scraggly fine hair (that would be me) and some have pretty luscious locks. Each month we have newcomers struggling on that shifting sand of a new cancer diagnosis. Cancer is relentless, and there is always a ready supply of new patients.  We don’t have all the answers for each other, but we share our stories in hopes that our own personal experiences and treatment will give hope to each other. For me, it’s comforting to know that many are living fully having successfully navigated this beast.

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Teepee-We prop each other up as we share our stories

We are like a big teepee-each of us is a stick that props up the total structure. It’s our collective nature that makes us powerful. Recently, there was an audible gasp when one of the women shared that she was entering palliative care (palliative care is primarily focused on providing pain relief rather than searching for a cure). She spoke of her situation matter-of-factly and at the time, I wished I could hug her pain away. Being among this group of loving and supporting women can’t cure the pain (or the disease), but it eases the burden of having to carry grim information all alone. We are also there for each other’s joys and triumphs!

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Hand reaching skyward!

How many times have you thought about someone who is fighting a major health issue (whether cancer of something else) and were afraid to reach out for saying the wrong thing? Saying nothing is equivalent to doing nothingKnowing that others are there to support you is a type of palliative care in itself. Matt continued, “For those of you who feel a storm brewing, I tell you this: learn to talk about the sky, and those crinked clouds of emotion that so often choke your voice. Feel the rain on your skin. I know that it’s scary to be vulnerable. But trust me, It’s scarier to be alone when it starts to storm.” Will you be successful when you reach out to those who are suffering? Maybe or maybe not. It’s the reaching out to each other than connects us all together.

Matt’s words were so powerful and they need to be heard. “And for those of you who have friends caught in that storm, learn to listen.  You might feel uncomfortable when they open up to you. You might be afraid to say the wrong thing, and somehow make the situation worse. But more often than not, people just want to be heard. They want to know that someone cares about them — that someone will be there by their side. The most comforting words that I have ever received were, “I’m sorry that it’s storming over there. That really sucks, but I care about you, and I’m here for you.”

Take the time to reach out to your friends who are facing grey skies–do it now!

Please watch Matt’s video: Separateness is an Illusion

*Matt is a recent graduate and an aspiring filmmaker who hopes to tell people’s last narratives in film

Breakn’ a Sweat-Great Aloha Run 2015

One of my students showed up to summer school class every day with large over-the-ear headphones listening to this song by Skrillex and The Doors-Breakn’ a Sweat (a largely repetitive, but somehow catchy electro/dub step song-you probably will not like). But, this song was in my head as I trained for the Great Aloha Run of 2015.

Skrillex and The Doors-Breakn' a Sweat
Skrillex and The Doors-Breakn’ a Sweat

I wasn’t even sure I could do the 8.15 mile Great Aloha Run (and just to clarify, I am talking about walking it, not running). My friend said multiple times, “you can always back out if you are not up to it.”  My plan was to just get up and get out there and see what happened. Up until Monday (race day), the longest training “run” was a 1.5 mile walk. In keeping with my 2015 goal of becoming STRONG I felt like it was important to at least get myself out of bed and get down there and try. My January training was stymied by a mega migraine that put me back several days (See Professional Vomit Queen). We woke up extra early to make our way to the Starting Line. IMG_3060 I stood on the corner watching the sun come up with my little team of two (Debbie and Ross). We stationed ourselves at the back of the pack along with the wheelchair participants and stroller moms and watched the sunrise reflected over Aloha Tower.

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Great Aloha Run-sun rising above the starting line.

Twenty thousand people had the same idea I did and were out there for the  Great Aloha Run! Interesting side note is that many more were registered and just didn’t show up. I am sure they had many good reasons, but come “game day” it didn’t happen. This is what the front of the line looked like (or so the newspaper told me). 

Great Aloha Run 2015
Great Aloha Run 2015

Despite a bad knee (Debbie), a bad calf (Ross) and sore hips (me), we finished! At one point, I jokingly said, we should do the Honolulu Marathon in December. This idea was introduced around mile 7, so the enthusiasm for it wasn’t as high as I had hoped.

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Finish Line-Ross in green

We completed the race in 2 hours and 25 minutes. Plus, when you add the time and distance to get to and from the start and finish line…we totaled 9.73 miles!

Runkeeper tally!
Runkeeper tally! 9.73 miles!
Dynamic Duo in our fancy new "finisher" T-shirts!
Dynamic Duo in our fancy new “finisher” T-shirts!

When my own children used to agonize over writing essays for English class, I used to tell them…It doesn’t have to be perfect, it just has to be done. Words on paper are better than no words at all. That is how I felt about this race. We could have been a lot faster and trained a lot more, but we still got out there and did it. Plus, we were together, which made it all the more fun! What’s my current situation? Still plugging away at maintenance chemo every three weeks. I had treatment yesterday and slept 12 hours straight in recovery last night. Still teaching! Still doing!