Tag Archives: radiation

PET SCAN-I’m Ready!

Do you remember in the early 90’s when “Take Your Daughter to Work Day” became a thing?

Today, you (and the kids) get to come with me to my PET scan and see what it’s all about! First, get to the hospital early and look for parking! (Create a parking spot in the grass on the hill.)

Tripler Army Medical Center
Tripler Army Medical Center-No Parking

Rush to get to the Nuclear Medicine Clinic-then wait!

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Nuclear Medicine Clinic at TAMC

and wait…

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Waiting room fun with the kids

The day prior to the scan: Prep instructions for PET scans. Basically, no carbs, no exercise, no alcohol, no nothing. In my house, we call that a “potato” day because we just sit around and do nothing.

The morning of the PET scan. Nothing but water. Drink it from a fun mug though!

Lucy Mug
Lucy Mug from Jan E.

Fill out all the paperwork!

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Surgeries? Radiation? Chemotherapy? Neulasta?

Check blood sugar! They ask if you’ve been fasting and this will prove it. Numbers must be between 80-200 to proceed. Whew, I passed! (No food or caffeine after midnight!)

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Fasting range should be between 80-200. I passed!

Next up! Radioactive dye injection. The radioactive sugar solution will migrate to the areas of “hyper-metabolic” activity (in other words, seeing something light up is bad!)

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Glucose Solution of Radioactive Dye (note the nice carrying case)

I’ve already been to the chemo room to get my port accessed! I’m Ready!

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Port accessed and ready to go! “I’m ready.”

After the radioactive dye…more waiting…45 minutes for the dye to circulate throughout your system. (My 45 minutes turned into an hour.) 

Finally!

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Fancy new PET scan machine at Tripler

The whole process takes about 3 hours. The actual scan only takes about 25 minutes! Then, off to lunch!

…and wait for results!

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Back in the Saddle-Getting the job done

Weekly reality TV shows start each week with a recap of the past weeks’ episodes including the most dramatic moments.

Does not include the Phernegen IV

So, if you are just turning in to this show, here’s what happened in previous episodes of “Kym’s Ovarian Cancer.” After successfully beating Ovarian Cancer in 2012, I received an ominous phone call from my docctor.   My blood cancer marker had unexpectedly doubled. To be specific, it was February 14th, and I was driving on the H3 from one side of the island to the other. When the doctor told me the news and indicated that the cancer was probably back, I had to pull over to the side of the road to take that information in. That was easily the worst Valentine’s Day ever!

Screenings and pre-surgery appointments followed. My exploratory (never-sounds-good-when-you-say-it) surgery was on March 10th. The affected area this time was the peri-aortic lymph nodes. This is apparently a dicey area in which to operate because the area is filled with a tricky vascular network. Four weeks post surgery, I began a series of 25 daily radiation treatments (I think we landed on 4500 CentriGreys) concentrated in the peri-aortic lymph node area. About a week after that was finished, we started on chemo. I was labeled Platinum sensitive, so Carboplatin was chosen again, along with Gemzar and Avastin. All medication is delivered via a port that has been surgically implanted in my chest wall. Fast forward through several failed WBC’s (White Blood Count) and unfortunate vomiting parties, we made it to July 4th!  We are again playing the  low can your white count go?  Then there was the Give yourself a Shot Day (Neulasta category),  If you were producing this as a show, it would make an excellent storyline with a huge cast of characters and a dramatic plot.  Maybe Christina Applegate will play me. Who will play you?

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In this week’s episode of Kym’s Ovarian Cancer, we get a major dose of fun! The first chemo of the cycle is all of the meds to include Carboplatin, Gemzar, and Avastin.  The prelude is a nice fat bag of anti-nausea meds. Today, they’ve added an extra bag of anti-nausea meds. (Today’s total of IV bags was 7: 2 bags of hydration, 1 bag of steroids/antinausea, 1 bag Carbo, 1 bag Gemzar, 1 bag Avastin, and a bag of Phenergen.) Next Friday will be a few bits of steroids and Gemzar. After the next treatment,  I’ll be halfway though  chemo. This will be a major milestone. Despite the fact that I am not even halfway now, I am still ecstatic! Why? I am going back to work next week! I am beyond excited about seeing the students and my fellow teachers. Just to be normal again (even with these Friday blips) is one of the things I am most looking forward to (did it hurt when I ended that sentence with a preposition?) On March 7, the last day I worked before my surgery, I went outside and the beautiful Mid Pac campus and the sweet Manoa air almost made me cry (Seinfeld’s Newman once said this about Hawaii…”The air is so dewy sweet that you don’t have to lick the stamps.”)

My favorite day of school is always the first day of school. It’s like the first hole on the golf course, no mistakes and everything is awesome (Check out the Lego movie). I predict now it will be a great first day. The chemo will drag on into October, so will keep the spirits up by hanging around fun people who make me laugh.  Maintaining that energy will be the largest problem through the fall terms . Side effects from chemo can last up to 6 months, so even if you’re done, you’re not done.

SPOILER ALERT: In future episodes, Kym will go on maintenance chemo. PET scan will occur in November to see if these meds are arresting the growth of the tumors. Watch the hilarity ensue!

 

Blood doesn’t lie

Each cycle of radiation or chemo is followed by the inevitable blood draw.  It takes about a week for the CA 125 Ovarian Cancer marker to come back.  Other blood markers are available in just a few days.  Every time they take blood, I wait anxiously for the results.  The last CA level blood marker was the harbinger of recurrence.  Even “normal” values can cause fear if they double or triple for the previous draw.  This go round, the hospital is using a new lab, so the numbers can’t be compared to previous values.  There is no joy or heartbreak associated with this number; it’s simply a number.  The plan, unless there is some anomaly is that I’ll start chemo next week.  Happy to be down with radiation, but remembering the trek that was the last chemo journey.  This time will be new drugs, which inevitably means new side effects.  In the meantime…trying to get healthy and recommending these documentaries on #NetflixMortified Nation, Queen of Versailles, Girl Model, Russia’s Toughest Prisons, Fat Sick & Nearly Dead. 

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The Flying Nun

Do you remember The Flying Nun-a TV series in the late 60’s and early 70’s? Along with The Brady Bunch and The Partridge Family…and of course Gilligan’s Island, these made up the favorite TV shows of my youth.  My sister-in-law took this picture of me getting set up for radiation and it brought back memories of Sally Field  as Sister Bertille, the nun who could fly. (What you are seeing in this image is when they drape warm sheets all around so that you don’t freeze! They keep this room mighty chilly.)  I promised my friend J. no belly shots, so you don’t get to see that.  I know you’re disappointed.  So, what are the tv shows that bring you back to childhood?

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